AgManager.info Update

Events

MAST: Management Analysis & Strategic Thinking
Begins: November 18-19, 2014
Two on-campus (2 day) sessions with distance learning in between.
See about it at: www.AgManager.info/MAST

Other Extension Meetings
A listing of other extension meetings taking place in Kansas.
Coming up:
Meeting in Blaine: September 10-11

2014 Ag Lenders Conferences
A one-day conference for agricultural lenders.
Garden City: October 7
Manhattan: October 8

2014 Kansas Crop Insurance Workshop
A one-day conference for farmers, crop insurance agents and ag lenders.
Salina: November 13

2014 Kansas Income Tax Institute
A two-day conference for tax professionals at 8 locations in Kansas
Garden City: November 4, starting location
Full schedule at: http://www.agmanager.info/events/Tax%20Institute/2014.asp


Updates

Frequently Asked Questions: Title I Programs of the 2014 Farm Bill
Robin Reid, Art Barnaby and Mykel Taylor provide an easy-to-understand reference for your questions about the 2014 Farm Bill.
www.AgManager.info/policy/commodity/2012/default.asp

2014 Risk and Profit Conference Presentations
All presentations from the 2014 Risk and Profit Conference hosted the K-State Department of Agricultural Economics last week are now available.
www.agmanager.info/events/risk_profit/2014/Papers.asp

 In the Cattle Markets
“Feed Supply and Demand” by Matthew Diersen, South Dakota State University.
www.AgManager.info/livestock/marketing/outlook/newsletters

Livestock Outlook Radio Program
Glynn Tonsor provides this week’s cattle market insight: he breaks down the latest USDA cattle-on-feed report and what that suggests about the geographical shift in cattle feeding in the central plains region, and he passes along his latest feedlot return projections.
www.AgManager.info/livestock/marketing/outlook/newsletters

Chinese Reforms and US Agriculture- Radio Interview
The keynote speaker at last week’s K-State Risk and Profit Conference, Iowa State University agricultural economist Dermot Hayes, talks about recent changes in agricultural and rural policy in China, and what those changes portend for U.S. agricultural interests, in terms of doing further export business with that country.
www.AgManager.info/news

Michael Springer – Featured Producer at Risk and Profit Conference – Radio Interview
A featured speaker at the Risk and Profit Conference, southeast Kansas hog and crop producer Michael Springer, talks about that path to success that his multi-generation family farm has followed, and about what he’s learned while serving as a public advocate for the hog industry in specific and agriculture in general…he believes that headway is being made by agriculture’s public outreach efforts.
www.AgManager.info/news

Grain Outlook Radio Program
Dan O’Brien summarizes his latest grain market outlook as presented at this week’s Risk and Profit Conference at K-State. Specifically, he dwells on declining row crop prices, and how those might factor into a grower’s post-harvest marketing strategy.
www.AgManager.info/news

Crop Basis Maps
GIS maps showing this week’s basis and deviation from the 3-year average for corn, wheat, soybeans and milo in the central Plains.
www.AgManager.info/marketing/basis/maps/archives

Updated Crop Basis Tool
Providing the weekly basis (Wednesday close) for corn, soybeans, milo and winter wheat for approximately 800 locations across Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas Panhandle, Nebraska, South Dakota and North Dakota.
www.AgManager.info/marketing/basis/tools/default.asp

Ag Law Update – Radio Interview
Agricultural law specialist Roger McEowen of Iowa State University goes over several fresh new court rulings of interest to agricultural producers, including a dispute over a change in a farmland leasing arrangement that lead to the former tenant paying a hefty penalty… and another liability case over livestock on a roadway.
www.AgManager.info/news

Livestock and Hay Charts
Price, basis, forecast, cattle slaughter, cattle cycle, cattle on feed, livestock feeding returns, meat trade charts and supply and demand for corn, wheat and soybeans.
www.AgManager.info/livestock/marketing/graphs

Declining APH Yields Has Become a “Hot” Issue
Nearly a year ago during the final debate on the Farm Bill, changes were suggested to deal with declining APH. Art Barnaby addresses what has happened since.
www.AgManager.info/crops/insurance/risk_mgt/default.asp


Robin Reid is the new Commercial Agriculture Economist in the Agricultural Economics Department.

New to the Department
Robin Reid
Reid recently joined the Agricultural Economics Department at K-State as the Commercial Agriculture Economist. She previously worked for four years as an Extension Agent in the River Valley District, with a focus on livestock production and farm management. Robin grew up on a farm in Wisconsin and earned a B.S. in Agricultural Business from UW-River Falls. She also holds a M.S. in Agricultural Economics from K-State.

 


MAB Trip to South America

K-State’s Master of Agribusiness (MAB) program is offering travel to Brazil and Argentina to learn about the food and agriculture industry in South America. The trip includes visits to agricultural and food-related industries and guided sightseeing tours with free time to explore Buenos Aires, the waterfalls at Iguazu and Sao Paulo. The tour, from February 20 to March 7, 2015, is open to anyone with an interest in international agribusiness.
For information, go to: www.mab.ksu.edu/Alumni/SAmerica15.html or contact Mary Bowen at 785-532-4435 or mjbowen@ksu.edu.


 

Be sure to keep up with other AgManager.info happenings on social media:
Twitter: @AgManagerInfo
Facebook: www.facebook.com/AgManager.info

Agribusiness Expert Sees Big Potential in China for U.S. Corn, Livestock Exports

Dermot Hayes expects urbanization trend in China; most citizens live on the best land.

Recent government policy changes in China have the potential to boost U.S. agriculture, particularly the corn and livestock sectors, according to Iowa State University economics and finance professor Dermot Hayes.

Speaking at Kansas State University’s 2014 Risk and Profit Conference Aug. 22, Hayes said that most of China’s population density is also where the best agricultural land is and there have been recent signs that citizens in its rural areas are being encouraged to move to urban areas.
China is similar in size to the UIMG_5384nited States, but has the world’s largest population, estimated at 1.355 billion people as of July, 2014, according to the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. That compares with India at 1.236 billion, the United States at 319 million and Russia at 142 million.“In China, the amount of corn and soybeans planted is determined by the government” and not by market forces, Hayes said, plus China has about one-fifth of the per capita water resources that the United States has. Thirty percent of the pork in China comes from smaller “backyard” producers that readily quit raising pigs once they can afford a car to drive to the grocery store and to find employment.

Hayes, who is the Pioneer Hi-Bred International Chair in Agribusiness at Iowa State, added that while China’s Ministry of Agriculture has traditionally protected its farmers, China’s new Premier Li Keqiang has been quoted as saying that protectionism is a blind alley, and that free trade can help achieve a global economic recovery. Li was a pupil of free-market economist Li Yining and is the first Chinese premier to have a doctorate in economics.

“I don’t know how this will turn out,” Hayes said but noted that private Chinese firms spent more on U.S. investments in the past 15 months than in the previous 11 years. He cited the purchase of Smithfield Foods Inc. in 2013 as an example.

Smithfield, whose brands included such familiar U.S. names as Armour, Farmland, and its own namesake, was bought by Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd., the largest shareholder of China’s biggest meat processor. At the time of the sale, the company had grown to annual sales of $13 billion and had about 46,000 employees, according to published reports.

Hayes acknowledged however that despite signs of potential in China, the Chinese government owns much of the country’s farmland and does not disseminate accurate land use data which makes it difficult to get accurate information.

“No one really knows how much land China has in crops,” he said although he estimated the figure at about 275 million crop acres, much of it poor quality land. “They are farming on land we wouldn’t because we can’t get a tractor up the hill, but you can (farm such land) if you have the manual labor.”
In contrast, the U.S. has about 360 million acres in crops and about 400 million acres of pasture.

Despite the uncertainty that shrouds China and its impact on the rest of the world, Hayes said that if China frees its people and urbanization moves forward, it will need as much as 140 million tons (more than 5 billion bushels) of corn, which is bigger than the impact ethanol has made on the market. If China moves to a more free market for its livestock markets, a large proportion of its future needs will be imported.

“The impact of livestock product imports on world markets will not be as severe as the alternative policy of importing grain. Chinese livestock have poor feed conversion efficiency because Chinese consumers have complimentary preferences to consumers in the West,” he said, noting that the Chinese prefer parts of the animal that U.S. consumers don’t.

When asked if the U.S. should be concerned about China buying U.S. assets, Hayes said that many in the U.S. had concerns when Japan went on a buying spree of U.S. companies in the 1980s. Those fears generally proved unfounded, he said, adding that the buildings and land are still here in the U.S.

A copy of Hayes’ presentation, as well as others from K-State’s 2014 Risk and Profit Conference is available at http://www.agmanager.info/events/risk_profit/2014/Papers.asp. An audio interview with Hayes is available on K-State Research and Extension’s Agriculture Today radio show at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/News/p.aspx?tabid=66. Scroll to U.S.Agricultural and Rural Policy in China, Aug. 25, 2014.

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K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

Story by:
Mary Lou Peter
mlpeter@ksu.edu
K-State Research and Extension
http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/

For more information:
K-State Department of Agricultural Economics – 785-532-6702, www.agmanager.info

Call for applications to the 2015-2016 class of Risk Management Student Fellows

Applications are now being accepted for the 2015‐16 class of Risk Management Student Fellows. The application deadline is September 12, 2014. The Student Fellow program provides a foundation for undergraduate and graduate students to gain hands‐on risk management skills and knowledge. More information is available at the CRMER website at http://www.k‐state.edu/riskmanagement/.

Students accepted to the program will receive fellowship stipends for three semesters. Target students include anyone interested in risk management with three semesters left in their program including graduate students as of Spring 2015 semester.  The program has high expectations for student academic performance as well as risk management interest and engagement, so we will be selective in reviewing applicants.

Applications should include a resume, a statement of career objectives, and contact information for two or more academic references. Send resume, reference list, and career objective statement via email attachments to Ted Schroeder, tcs@ksu.edu by September 12, 2014 (he will confirm receipt of your application via email reply). Contact Ted Schroeder, Waters Hall 219, if you have questions.

Bob Burton presenting “Last Lecture” TODAY at 4:00 in K-State Union

More Than 5,000 Students Later, K-State’s Burton to Give One ‘Last Lecture’

From “Production Economics” to “Rural Banking,” for 30 years Bob Burton has helped shape students’ understanding of economic theory and more. The Kansas State University agricultural economics professor will give one last lecture on Tuesday, Aug. 26 and this time the public is invited.

Robert BurtonBurton will speak about the reflections of his career in the Cottonwood Room of the K-State Union at 4 p.m. CDT. Refreshments will be served. He retired on July 5.

The lecture is one of several planned this fall as part of a “Last Lecture” series in which several K-State Department of Agricultural Economics faculty members will give one last lecture for the campus community and the public shortly after retiring.

Burton taught numerous courses since coming to K-State in 1984 as an assistant professor. He became professor in 1999.

He is credited with being instrumental in the department’s distance education movement through his undergraduate “Farm and Ranch Management” course. He also taught “Farm Resource Acquisition and Finance,” “Farm Management Strategies,” “Advanced Farm Economics,” and “Computer Applications in Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.”

Through those courses and his earlier work at West Virginia University, Burton taught more than 5,000 students.

Burton said he particularly enjoyed teaching “Production Economics” because it taught students to understand economic theory, which was useful in whatever careers they chose.

His research often focused on risk and return in whole-farm or ranch management and most recently, on farm land ownership as a retirement strategy and agricultural health and safety.

Burton earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in agricultural economics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1969 and 1977, respectively. He earned a Ph.D. in agricultural economics at Purdue University in 1982.

Before coming to K-State, he was an assistant professor at West Virginia University and also served in the U.S. Navy for four years.

Some of his honors included the Gamma Sigma Delta Outstanding Teaching Award, 2008; Recognized by Mortar Board Senior Honor Society of Kansas State University for “Outstanding commitment to students of Kansas State University” 2007; and the Western Agricultural Economics Association, Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching with More Than 10 Years of Experience, 2003.

More information about Burton’s Aug. 26 lecture or any in the “Last Lecture” series is available by contacting Judy Maberry at judym@k-state.edu or 785-532-4493.


Story by: Mary Lou Peter, mlpeter@ksu.edu K-State Research and Extension http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/

Update number 3 from Melissa Lynes in Germany: Let the Meetings begin!

Let the Meetings begin!

I arrived in Lindau on Monday around lunch time and was able to meet a few other students from the U.S. delegate as soon as I arrived. We spent the day getting to know each other and exploring the beautiful island of Lindau.

Tuesday we checked into the conference and picked up our packet of materials. All of the students from the U.S. delegate had lunch with all of the sponsoring organizations (Mars, NSF, and ORAU). We then had a dinner with all the other young economist in attendance. It was amazing to be able to talk to students from around the world.

Today marked the first official day of the conference. We heard from five different Nobel Laureates this morning. The presentations were extremely interesting. During the opening ceremonies the Chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel, gave the keynote address.

Tonight’s dinner was probably the most exciting of the week, I had dinner with Daniel McFadden. It was amazing to pick the brain of someone who I have read so much of their work. He was truly an amazing person.

If you want to hear more about my dinner with Daniel McFadden, Chancellor Merkel or the rest of the experience I will be presenting during a brown bag lunch sometime in September.

Stay tuned for more updates!
Melissa L

Welcome back events at K-State!

Check out the following events for students as we begin our new Fall Semester at K-State!


#AGECONFALL2014

#KSTATEWOW


Pancake Feed
Free pancake and sausage breakfast for first 5,000 K-State students.
Time: August 23, 2014, 10:00 p.m.
Location: Memorial Stadium

Convocation
Come start the academic year with special presentations to commemorate the start of the school year! Free t-shirts and other gifts for NEW STUDENTS!
Time: August 24, 2014, 5:45  p.m.
Location: Bramlage Coliseum

K-State Kickoff
Immediately following Convocation, join us for dinner then learn the traditions of K-State!
Time: August 24, 2014, 7 p.m. (following Convocation)
Location: Bill Snyder Family Stadium, East Side

Union Expo and Activities Carnival
Browse 200 student organizations who are looking to help you find a fun and exciting organization to join. Enjoy free giveaways!
Time: August 28, 2014, 6 p.m.
Location: K-State Student Union

College of Agriculture Watermelon Feed
Time: September 2, 2014, 6:15 p.m.
Location: Weber Lawn
Sponsored by Ag Council.  For more information, contact Candace Wilson at clwilson@ksu.edu or Christopher Mushrush at mush54@ksu.edu.

 

For a full list of University Week of Welcome events go here: http://84777.orgsync.com/org/weekofwelcome/home

Update number 2 from Melissa Lynes: Live in Germany!

Greetings from Germany!

After a few days of exploring Munich and Fussen I am off to Lindau early tomorrow morning. As much fun as I am having being a tourist, I am looking forward to getting to Lindau tomorrow. I am excited to meet the other students in the US delegate and for the meetings to start.

Schloss Neuchwanstein

Schloss Neuchwanstein

Fussen City Center

Fussen City Center

The last two days I spent exploring Fussen and the areas around it. Yesterday I went and saw Schloss Hohenschwangau and Schloss Neuschwanstein. I only write out these long names in case you want to look them up. These are two castles located about three miles form Fussen (it was a great walk between the towns). The second castle is one that everyone should recognize, it is the inspiration for Cinderella’s castle. Though only a third of the inside was ever completed it was beautiful on the inside and out. I highly recommend the trip to visit it if you are ever out this way!

Today I spent the day visiting a monastery and humble castle in Fussen. Most of both of these were completed by 13th century. It blows my mind to think of buildings being around that long. I also went for a hike to a beautiful lake situated between a few mountains.

I lucked out this weekend being in Fussen. There were concerts in the city center last night and all day today. There were even a couple of bands that were playing American Country music!

Along the way yesterday and today I passed a few cow pastures that sounded a lot different then the ones back home. All of the cows were wearing cow bells!

That is all for now. When I write again I will be writing from Lindau!

Tschuss!
Melissa L

K-State Staff and Students Among AAEA Award Winners

Members of K-State’s Department of Agricultural Economics take home awards at the 2014 AAEA annual meeting.

Two Kansas State University faculty members and four graduate students in the Department of Agricultural Economics received awards at the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA) annual meeting, hosted July 26-29, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The AAEA is a not-for-profit association serving the professional interests of members working in agricultural and broadly related fields of applied economics.

Brian Briggeman, associate professor and Arthur Capper Cooperative Center (ACCC) director, was awarded the AAEA’s Distinguished Teaching Award for Less than 10 Years’ Experience. This award recognizes and encourages meritorious performance in undergraduate and graduate teaching in agricultural or applied economics, as defined by the AAEA vision statement. By receiving this award, Briggeman is honored for his dedication to students and his passion for teaching.

Mykel R. Taylor, assistant professor, was awarded an AAEA trust scholarship award, the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (AARES)-AAEA Young Professional Exchange Program Heading South Award. Taylor’s award allowed her to travel to Australia and continue active research in comparing forward contracting in wheat, and the cost associated, to Australia’s agricultural industry practices. Researchers from Australia also come to the United States as a part of this exchange and award program.

Graduate students Michelle Estes, Emily Mollohan and Steven Ramsey received first place in the Graduate Student Case Study Competition with advisor Aleksan Shanoyan, assistant professor. The Case Study Competition is a long and prestigious tradition for the AAEA and allows graduate students to test their communication skills and their ability to apply their knowledge of agricultural economics and agribusiness subjects to practical situations. Every year, groups of students have a chance to show off their skills and win prize money, as well as the honor of being a competition winner.

Graduate student Melissa McKendree placed first in the Graduate Student Extension Competition with mentor Glynn Tonsor, associate professor. Each year, the Extension Section in collaboration with the Graduate Student Section puts on the Graduate Student Extension Competition. This competition provides graduate student competitors the opportunity to develop extension and outreach programs from their research.

For more information regarding the AAEA, its awards and selection criteria, visit aaea.org (https://www.aaea.org/about-aaea/awards-and-honors/aaea-annual-awards/aaea-annual-award-winners/2014-aaea-annual-award-winners).

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K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus, Manhattan.

Story by:
Shelby Alyssa Mettlen
shelby11@ksu.edu
K-State Research & Extension

For more information:
Amanda Erichsen, Communications Coordinator, Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University – aerichsen@ksu.edu or 785-532-6994

Update from Melissa Lynes, headed to the Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences in Germany!

Guten Tag aus Deutschland! (Good day from Germany!)

I am wrapping up my second day of travel through Germany before heading to Lindau on Monday for the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences. After spending the afternoon and evening taking in the sights and tastes of Munich on Thursday I hopped on a train to Fussen this morning which is where I will be until Monday.

The two areas of the country cannot be more different. Munich is located in the country side and is full tall buildings, lots of traffic and lots of people. The old buildings in some sections of the city were truly amazing. Every place you visit there are a few “must dos” and I was able to hit three of them while in Munich. The first is something I will probably never see anywhere else. In the clock tower of the Mariensaule (a building in the middle of Munich built in 1638), life size marionettes come to life to move along with a glockenspiel. I then ventured through their version of city park, except it is much bigger. Inside the park the supports of a bridge come together to create waves that are big enough for surfing. There was almost a dozen guys braving the 60 degree weather and taking there chances on the inland waves. Even though it was not Octoberfest I could not leave Munich without trying one of their beers at a traditional beer hall. The hall was huge full of large group style tables and was as loud as could be.

Melissa Lynes GermanyIt was a beautiful ride to Fussen this morning. We passed through quaint cities, corn fields, and trees as we wound our way south through the Bavarian country side almost reaching Austria. Fussen is a very small, old city situated just north of the Alps (and by just north, I mean a few feet from my hotel until you reach the Alps). There is a lot of pedestrian traffic around town, as it is the best way to get around the cobble streets. I spent most of the afternoon window shopping (mainly because today is a national holiday so a lot of stores were closed). Tonight I took a tour out to see a couple near by castles lit up in the dark. Tomorrow I will get to tour the inside of the castles.

Sorry for the lack of pictures thus far, I have not taken many on my phone but stay tuned for more updates and pictures from Germany.

Auf Wiedersehen (for now) – Melissa L

PS: for those of you who do not know why I am in Germany, I was selected as one of 29 students from the US and one of 450 students from around the world to attend the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences. I am being sponsored by Mars, Inc (yes the candy company). The point of this meeting is to bring young economist from around the world to interact with each other as well as listen to, learn from, and interact with 18 Nobel Laurette winners in economics. I am the only person from the US who is from an agricultural department at the meetings. I am both humbled and honored to have been chosen and cannot wait to share my experience at the meetings.

Call for applications to the 2015-2016 class of Risk Management Student Fellows

Applications are now being accepted for the 2015‐16 class of Risk Management Student Fellows. The application deadline is September 12, 2014. The Student Fellow program provides a foundation for undergraduate and graduate students to gain hands‐on risk management skills and knowledge. More information is available at the CRMER website at http://www.k‐state.edu/riskmanagement/.

Students accepted to the program will receive fellowship stipends for three semesters. Target students include anyone interested in risk management with three semesters left in their program including graduate students as of Spring 2015 semester.  The program has high expectations for student academic performance as well as risk management interest and engagement, so we will be selective in reviewing applicants.

Applications should include a resume, a statement of career objectives, and contact information for two or more academic references. Send resume, reference list, and career objective statement via email attachments to Ted Schroeder, tcs@ksu.edu by September 12, 2014 (he will confirm receipt of your application via email reply). Contact Ted Schroeder, Waters Hall 219, if you have questions.

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