Category Archives: Undergraduate Students

Harner and Kays selected for Blue Key leadership

Garret Kays

Garrett Kays

The Kansas State University chapter of Blue Key, a senior honorary, selected new members and appointed new positions Tuesday, May 26, 2015.

Elizabeth Harner, senior in agribusiness from St. George, is the new director of banquet and recognition. Garrett Kays, senior in agricultural economics from Weir, is the new President of K-State’s Blue Key chapter.

Blue Key honors students for excellence in service, scholarship and leadership. Two agricultural economics students were elected for new officer positions.

Elizabeth harner

Elizabeth Harner

Students elected for officer positions within Blue Key are expected to hold two leadership positions in an organization.

Organizations can be either student-run or community involvement opportunities. In addition to leadership experience, students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average to be eligible for membership.

Read more about Blue Key’s leadership.


Article by Kansas State University

Advertisements

Abigail Friesen earns honorable mention for Kirmser Undergraduate Research

kirmser (1)

Abigail Friesen, freshman in agricultural economics, received honorable mention for her essay: “Informative report: Immigration and job opportunities” at the Kirmser Award ceremony on May 13. Friesen wrote the essay for her expository writing class, under the instruction of Erica Ruscio, Master’s student in English.

The Kirmser Undergraduate Research Awards recognize the work of undergraduate student scholarship. The award is presented by K-State Libraries and possible through a gift made by Philip and Jeune Kirmser. Sandy Chastan, the Kirmser’s daughter, made an appearance at the ceremony.

Kirmser Awards are divided into three categories and awarded to students engaging in academic research and inquiry. The three categories for research awards are: group work, individual freshman projects, and non-freshman individual projects.
Eighteen students won awards or received mention at the Kirmser Undergraduate
Research Award Ceremony.

Read more about Kirmser Undergraduate Research Award honors.


Article and picture provided by K-State Media Services.

K-State’s College of Agriculture Celebrates Success and Looks Ahead to a Productive Future

Dean John Floros presented his second annual State of the College of Agriculture address March 25.
Kansas State University’s College of Agriculture aims to be a top-five agricultural college in the United States by 2025, and in collaboration with K-State Research and Extension, it intends to continue serving as a global destination for education, research and extension. Reaching this feat not only would benefit the university, but it would benefit the citizens of Kansas and beyond with immediate solutions to needs in agricultural production.

Agriculture is Kansas’ largest economic driver, as it contributes $53 billion to the Kansas economy and is the state’s largest employer, said John Floros, dean of the college and director of K-State Research and Extension.

In his third year as dean, Floros presented his second annual State of the College of Agriculture address March 25 on K-State’s Manhattan campus. He discussed celebrating successes that are getting the college closer to a top-five agricultural college, some of which include growth in the number of students, faculty and staff success, competitive funding, research expenditures, private fundraising, and the college’s national and international reputation.

On the heels of more cuts in state funding, the college has been able to counter these budget cuts and embrace change, Floros said. Aside from the amount of state funding available, all other numbers continue to go up, which is why he is optimistic that the college will continue to experience success in the future.

“K-State will remain here, but change will happen,” Floros said. “We will have to change, and if we are ahead of change and anticipate it, we are better off. Let’s anticipate budget cuts and figure out ways to counter those.”

Sean Fox Trading class

Students in Sean Fox’s class get a taste of the pit in his trading class!

Teaching and learning
K-State’s College of Agriculture has experienced steady growth in all student metrics. In 2014, the college had 2,780 undergraduate students—525 more than in 2010, which showed 2,255 undergraduates. The number of multicultural students in the college has doubled in the last five to six years, with a total of 291 in 2014. This means more than 10 percent of undergraduate students are multicultural.

Floros reported 695 undergraduate students call states other than Kansas home. These students represent 44 other states. Eighty-three undergraduates come from 19 other countries.

The college is nearly equal in the number of male and female undergraduates: males at 51 percent and females at 49 percent. Along with higher student enrollment, there has been an increase of 54 percent in scholarships provided in the last four years. Scholarships awarded in 2014-15 totaled $1.34 million.

Nearly all undergraduate students find jobs following graduation or pursue graduate degrees. The college has a 97 percent placement rate for students in jobs or a graduate education.

“It’s an exciting time to be a student in the College of Agriculture,” Floros said. “Every time I talk to our students that excitement comes through.”

Graduate students in the College of Agriculture are also on the rise. In 2014, there were 590 graduate students compared to 481 in 2010. Floros called this a huge success that helps the college meet its teaching, research and extension goals.

K-State’s Collegiate Crops Judging Team recently won its sixth straight national championship, and in fact, it has won 13 of the last 16 championships. In its first year competing, K-State’s Agronomy Forage Bowl Team won the national competition in 2015. Students are studying abroad in countries all over the world such as Argentina, Brazil, Ireland, France, India, South Africa, Spain and Japan.

Mykel Taylor 2015 Farm Bill meeting in Wichita

Mykel Taylor presents Farm Bill updates in February of 2015 in Wichita. The K-State Farm Bill Team reached more than 4,000 Kansans during 14 meetings held across the state!

Research and extension
The College of Agriculture, with K-State Research and Extension, have identified and are working toward solving five grand challenges for Kansas, which include global food systems, water, health, community vitality and developing tomorrow’s leaders. Other colleges at the university also are helping improve the livelihoods of Kansans in finding solutions to these challenges.

Floros recognized the college’s work across the state to help farmers make better management and farm policy decisions. Kansas State continues to develop the top wheat varieties used by Kansas’ farmers. A fungal genetics center that moved to K-State last fall will help the Department of Plant Pathology and wheat breeding programs continue to become more successful.

Plant Pathology is one of the several nationally ranked programs from K-State’s College of Agriculture. In fact, the Department of Plant Pathology is ranked No. 1 nationally. The agricultural economics program comes in at No. 4, interdepartmental food science at No. 9 and plant sciences at No. 10.

The animal science doctoral program for research productivity recently received a No. 5 national ranking, and the entomology doctoral program has been ranked No. 8. The Department of Grain Sciences and Industry at K-State is unique, Floros said, as there is no other department like it anywhere else.

Extramural awards for research in K-State’s College of Agriculture totaled $46.3 million in fiscal year 2014, which has increased steadily the last few years from $23.8 million in 2011. Floros said total K-State Research and Extension expenditures were at $142 million in 2014, an increase of 8 million from 2011 and 17 million from 2010.

Many faculty and students in the College of Agriculture are working with new programs funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, or USAID. These four new Feed the Future Innovation Labs were funded in total by $102.2 million. The labs focus on research surrounding sorghum and millet, applied wheat genomics, postharvest loss reduction and sustainable intensification. Only Kansas State and the University of California-Davis have received four such new USAID labs.

Top K-State faculty members specializing in agricultural related areas continue to be recognized nationally and internationally with awards in teaching and research. Many are also selected to lead national organizations related to horticulture, weed science and entomology, as examples.

Private fundraising also was up in 2014 for the College of Agriculture and K-State Research and Extension at $14.5 million. This is more than triple the amount from 2009, which was $4.4 million. Increases in private fundraising will help meet the current and future costs for programs, research, new facilities and facility upgrades, and other needs of the college.

“The bottom line remains that we need new facilities,” Floros said. “We need new state-of-the-art labs, teaching facilities, extension facilities and distance education facilities. We have to push for this happening now. We need to prioritize our needs.”

A video of Floros’ full presentation can be found on the K-State Research and Extension Seminars website. Learn more about the College of Agriculture at www.ag.k-state.edu and K-State Research and Extension at www.ksre.ksu.edu.


Story by:Katie Allen katielynn@ksu.edu / 785-532-1162 / K-State Research and Extension

For more information: John Floros, dean, K-State College of Agriculture – floros@k-state.edu or 785-532-7137

Wichita Farm Bill meeting videos now available online at AgManager.info – 4 meetings left to attend

Coverage from the 2014 Farm Bill meeting held in Wichita (Jan. 12, 2015), is now available online at http://www.agmanager.info/policy/commodity/2012/default.asp.

There are 4 videos that include Art Barnaby’s presentation, 1 video including Jody Campiche’s cotton presentation (Oklahoma State University Agricultural Economics), 1 video of Mykel Taylor’s presentation, and 1 video of Wichita’s FSA representative, Sean Rafferty.

On this page, click the link in the “download” column to view these videos in a new window.  When in the new video window, select the “info” button in the video browser to show links to more information. If you have questions about these videos or need assistance, please contact Rich Llewelyn at rvl@ksu.edu.

Remaining meetings occur:
Feb. 10 – Phillipsburg
Feb. 11 – Hays
Feb. 12 – Frankfort
Feb. 13 – Atchison
These events are free, however have been full at every location.  Reserve your seat by contacting the local county extension agent for each location, details can be found here.

I Had to Go to Guatemala to Learn to Listen: Grunewald to give Last Lecture

Grunewald lightenedIn 1978, Orlen Grunewald joined the Kansas State University Department of Agricultural Economics.

An expert in agribusiness, Grunewald will deliver his last lecture, “I had to go to Guatemala to learn to listen” on Wednesday, Feb. 4 at 3:30 p.m. in room 328 Waters Hall. Refreshments will be served.

The lecture is one of several planned as part of a “Last Lecture” series in which several K-State Department of Agricultural Economics faculty members will give one last lecture for the campus community and the public shortly after retiring.

“Dr. Grunewald had an outstanding career at Kansas State University and in the agribusiness area,” said Allen Featherstone, professor and head of the K-State Department of Agricultural Economics. “One of his lasting legacies is the initiation of the commodities trading course where students take actual market positions.

Through his career, he has studied and contributed to our understanding of commodity markets.  He and the other retiring professors that are a part of this Last Lecture series have had a great impact on thousands of students and agriculture in the state of Kansas. The Department of Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture and the university are very grateful for their contributions and dedication to Kansas State University and agricultural economics. It is always inspirational to hear from one’s colleagues as they reflect upon their careers.  We encourage everyone to attend this series so they can reflect on their career.”

Grunewald, professor emeritus in the agricultural economics department, taught many undergraduate courses in agribusiness management, agribusiness marketing, and computer applications. He authored a textbook on food and agribusiness management for beginning students. His research activities focus on investigating the impacts of identity-preserved crops and livestock on supply chain management and agribusiness structures.

Grunewald earned his bachelor’s degree in regional planning at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in 1973.  He earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. in agricultural economics at the University of Kentucky in 1975 and 1980, respectively.

His research included investigating the structural efficiency of agricultural producers and agribusinesses in the supply chain; learning about entrepreneurship and integration in agri-food supply chains to understand the innovation processes that shape the supply chains; identifying key success factors in value-added enterprises; creating a series of educational modules based in applied research on value-added agriculture; and developing commercialization protocols to facilitate producer participation in wealth-creation value-adding initiatives.

He belonged to the American Agricultural Economics Association; Southern Agricultural Economics Association, serving on the editorial board for four years; and the Food Distribution Research Society.  He also served on the International Committee for the American Council on Consumer Interests in 1990.

Grunewald also was a Kansas State University Presidential Lecturer in 1986.

More information about his lecture or any in the “Last Lecture” series is available by contacting Judy Maberry at judym@k-state.edu or 785-532-4493.


 

Story by:
Elaine Edwards
elainee@ksu.edu
K-State Research and Extension, http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/

Student event update: NAMA meeting tonight, Monday, September 29

TODAY – September 29 7:30 p.m. Chips, Dips and Internships; a panel of students talking about their internships. We are collaborating with ACT and AgEcon club. There will be two students from each club on the panel and we plan to recognize all students in our 3 clubs that had an internship over the summer. Of course there will be chips and dip at the event because they are delicious and it rhymes so well with internships! 328 Waters Hall.


Club Meetings – Twice a month, on set Mondays at 7:30

NAMAAt our student chapter meetings, guest speakers provide valuable insight on a variety of topics including:

  • Career Development
  • Marketing
  • Motivation
  • Research and Development
  • Personal Advancement
  • Advertising
  • Public Relations
  • Sales

To learn about upcoming meetings:

-Like our page on Facebook – Follow us on Twitter @KansasStateNAMA – For any questions or if you would like to be added to the listserv please contact: Marie Annexstad: mannexst@ksu.edu

http://www.ageconomics.k-state.edu/undergraduate-programs/student-organizations/nama/index.html

K-State agricultural economist to discuss crop production, conservation on the farm

Jason Bergtold, associate professor of agricultural economics at Kansas State University, will give a public lecture at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 2, in 231 Ackert Hall.

Bergtold will discuss balancing economics, environmental stewardship and crop production risk on Kansas farms. His talk is being presented for students participating in the capstone course of the natural resources and environmental science secondary major and is open to the general public as part of the Natural Resources and Environmental Science Seminar Series. Undergraduate students interested in natural resources, environmental science and sustainability issues are especially encouraged to attend.

The natural resources and environmental science secondary major and its seminar series is generously supported by the Office of the Provost, College of Agriculture, College of Arts & Sciences, and the biological and agricultural engineering department.

http://www.k-state.edu/today/announcement.php?id=15764&category=events&referredBy=email

By: Shawn Hutchinson

Logan Britton earns 2014 Forrest Bassford Award

Logan Britton, a senior majoring in agricultural communications and agriculture economics at Kansas State University, is the recipient of the 2014 Livestock Publications Council (LPC) Forrest Bassford Student Award sponsored by Alltech. Britton was presented a $2,000 scholarship and a plaque during the Ag Media Summit (AMS) held in Indianapolis, Indiana, July 26-30.

Logan BrittonBritton, the son of Tara and Henry Britton from Bartlett, Kansas, is an active member of Agricultural Communicators of Tomorrow (ACT), Student National Agri-Marketing Association and the Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity. He is a KSU College of Agriculture ambassador. Britton also serves on the KSU College of Agriculture student council as a student senator. He is a member of LPC, the American Agricultural Editor’s Association (AAEA) and National FFA Alumni Association.

In addition to his involvement in collegiate clubs and national organizations, Britton serves as the office manager for the KSU College of Agriculture academic programs and a teaching assistant in the department of communications and agricultural education. This summer, he is participating in an internship sponsored by AAEA with the National FFA organization.

“I didn’t grow up living on a farm or showing livestock. Realizing how important agriculture is, I want to bridge the gap that exists between the field and the plate today,” said Britton. “I owe several people for opportunities provided to me and my growth – I’m truly honored to receive this award.”

The Forrest Bassford award honors excellence, professionalism and leadership among students. Each year, following a competitive application process, the LPC Student Award Program presents four young people travel scholarships to attend AMS. In addition to Britton, this year’s travel award winners were Breanne Brammer, University of Missouri; Courtney Leeper, University of Missouri and Lynsey Meharg, Texas Tech University. While at the meeting, the four finalists’ portfolios were reviewed and each was interviewed by a panel of professionals.

2014 marks the 29th year for the Student Award Program. Forrest Bassford’s name was appended to the LPC Student Award in 1992 in honor of his contribution to LPC, and his particular interest in furthering the Student Award. Alltech has co-sponsored the award since 2012.

“Today’s young agricultural journalists must not only be excellent communicators, but also able to successfully multitask between various social and traditional media channels. They must be ‘agvocates’ and educate a growing urban population about our industry. Finally they must be catalysts for change as they share new technologies developed and polices passed with their readers,” said Ann Hess, North America field PR manager for Alltech. “We are pleased to present this award to a fine young leader in agricultural journalism and wish Logan the best in his future aspirations.”

 

http://www.cattlenetwork.com/cattle-news/latest/K-State-Student-receives-2014-Forrest-Bassford-Award-270912611.html

 

Alumnus Matt Wolters to speak at New Student Convocation on Aug. 24

The second New Student Convocation is from 5:45-6:45 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 24, at Bramlage Coliseum.

This ceremonial beginning of the new academic year will feature the Kansas State University Faculty Brass Quintet, President Schulz and Provost Mason and a short video on K-State’s land-grant history.

Remarks for the benefit of new undergraduate students will be given by Greg Eiselein, director of K-State First; Katie Noll, Le’Andre Carthen and Anallely Dominguez, current students; 2014 Distinguished Young Alumni Award recipients Molly Hamm and Matt Wolters; and Ali Malekzadeh, dean of the College of Business Administration.

The picnic and pep rally at Bill Snyder Family Stadium will begin around 7:30 p.m. after the conclusion of the New Student Convocation. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend both events.

http://www.k-state.edu/today/announcement.php?id=14760&category=events&referredBy=email

Written by Steve Dandaneau

Animal Health Industry Insights Seminar: Introduction to Compounding

K-State Olathe is site for professional development opportunity

Kansas State University’s Master of Agribusiness (MAB) program is hosting an Animal Health Industry Insights seminar on Tuesday, Aug. 5 at noon at the K-State Olathe Campus.

Featured speaker, Denise E. Farris is the managing member of the Farris Law Firm, L.L.C., practicing general business, commercial construction, equine/agricultural law and offering mediation and arbitration services. She will present “Introduction to Compounding” pharmaceuticals for the animal health industry, as well as take questions from the audience.

Farris’s practice, which is rated “AV,” the highest peer review rating for expertise and ethics, puts a special emphasis on small business, risk management, general contract, government contracting and minority/women business certification issues on a local, state and national level. She also has contract expertise in equine law services, providing risk management contracts for large breeding, boarding and training stables nationwide in areas such as Equine Activity Liability Act compliance, boarding, breeding, sales, training, lesson and syndication agreements.

The seminar is open to the public, but attendees must register and pay the $25 registration fee by July 31 at https://commerce.cashnet.com/KSUMABSTORE. The fee includes lunch. For more information about the seminar contact Mary Bowen at 785-532-4435 or mjbowen@ksu.edu.

K-State’s Master of Agribusiness (www.mab.ksu.edu) is an award-winning, distance-education degree program that focuses on food, animal health and agribusiness management. Students and alumni work in every sector of the food, animal health and agribusiness industry and are located in 40 states within the United States and in more than 30 countries.

Story by:
Mary Bowen – 785-532-4435 or mjbowen@ksu.edu
www.mab.ksu.edu

For more information:
Mary Bowen – 785-532-4435 or mjbowen@ksu.edu

http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news