Glynn Tonsor to address expansion and beef economics in November 5th webinar

Believe it or not, expansion in the cattle market will be the topic of the Beef Cattle Economics Webinar, Nov. 5 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. (central).

Economic indicators are pointing to a rebuilding of the cattle herd, but not everywhere. Register today for an in-depth economic forecast and discussion on prospects and implications of herd expansion.

During this final installment of the Beef Cattle Economics 2013 series, Glynn Tonsor, livestock economist at Kansas State University, tackles when, where and how the herd will expand, and will address questions about the impact for stakeholders throughout the beef and cattle industry.

Tonsor joined the K-State Department of Agricultural Economics faculty as an Assistant Professor in March 2010.  He earned his Ph.D. from K-State in 2006 and was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University from May 2006 to March 2010.

Tonsor’s current efforts are primarily devoted to a range of integrated research and extension activities with particular focus on the cattle/beef and swine/pork industries. His broader interests include aspects throughout the meat supply chain ranging from production level supply issues to end-user consumer demand issues.

The webinar is sponsored by Merck Animal Health.  The Beef-Cattle Economics Series is a coordinated partnership between Kansas State University, Beef magazine, Drovers magazine and Meetingplace.  Click here to register and for more information.

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